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priority and they have the full support of her majesty's government and the brilliant words they do. >> this is helping tax my own party headquarters and my own party members. i thank the executive to get to that. a recent attack on party colleagues and offices and constituency offices and staff threatened intimidation from loyalists, and if confirmed, all threats of political motivated violence will be triggered by republican attacks. >> discussing this for mr. david this morning, if it is unacceptable, all that staff were intimidated in any way comment and i know that the justice minister and i will continue to defend the ability of politicians in northern ireland to carry out their duties. >> questions for the prime minister? dr. julian lewis, number one, mr. speaker. >> before i answer my hon. friend's question i am sure the house will wish to join me in thanking the duke and duchess of cambridge on the wonderful news they are expecting their first child, the perfect piece of news to end and in court a -- extraordinary jubilee year. joining the question on afghanistan veteran gl
by the government on purpose. and today, in syria, where they are in year two of a very violent uprising, someone today in syria turned off the whole internet. the whole thing. for the whole country. all of a sudden. like a light switch. look at this graph. shows people using the internet in syria this morning. typing along. tweeting. whatever. and then, boom. lights out. no more internet in syria. somebody hit the off switch. here's another view. the internet in syria humming along, and then all of a sudden, nothing. syria has three cables that connect it to the rest of the world. as of about noon today, local time, this shows the traffic on those cables. all three cables just shut down instantly, off a cliff, nothing moving into syria, nothing flowing out. it's not like this has never happened before. syria has shut down the internet at times of military offensives in this uprising before. and we have seen other governments do this before. the government in egypt shut down the internet last year during the revolution there that toppled mubarak. same thing with government in libya. in the months
. >> afghan withdrawal -- the german government backs a big cut in its forces, but is it too much too soon? >> the european union agrees on a set of tougher rules to limit the insolence of the world's largest rating agencies. >> and countdown to wagner's 200th anniversary. a major performance of "the rain." the german cabinet has backed a plan to cut troop numbers in afghanistan by 1/3 in the coming year. foreign combat troops are set to leave the country by the end of 2014, but a training and support force will remain behind. >> nato forces have been struggling with the logistics of the withdrawal, and it is unclear if the afghan national army can survive. >> german forces in afghanistan can look forward to coming home. it is the modern german army's most extensive mission, but the end is in sight. the government has agreed on a gradual withdrawal from afghanistan. 1/3 of nearly 5000 soldiers are to be pulled out by the start of 2014. a year later, all german soldiers will have left, but stability is a key issue. that is why some soldiers will serve beyond 2014. their task will be to supp
government and freep enterprise movement and connect those policies. >> why has there been a failure to connect? >> i'm not sure there is one reason for it and i haven't had time to think about it why it has happened but it needs to happen. the principles we stand for, free enterprise and limited government is the only way to stabilize and grow our middle class which i hope every american can attain. >> how worried are you about the republican chances -- >> you mean from the voters' perspective. the demographic changes? i don't think any voter in america -- there are voters that are locked into one party or the other but the fastest growing group is people who vote for candidates and not parties and people understand the issues and hopes that they have and offer real and concrete policy situations and real role for government to play in addressing those angst yits they face. we are one election away to do it. we have to recognize what it is and concentrate on doing it. >> how much of a danger to republicans do you think is posed by the changing demographic? >> it's not a danger but i
and money. i don't know how i'm supposed to live. >> reporter: the philippine government is trying to distribute goods and dispatch medical staff to the affected areas. but destroyed roads and bridges are hampering relief operations. gas stations have been damaged, and there's a shortage of fuel. mindanao was hit by another typhoon just a year ago, leaving 1,200 people dead. with another disaster so soon, people are questioning the government's preparedness. president beanything know aquino issued a wning a day before the typhoon struck and told people to be prepared. but it wasn't enough to prevent extensive damage. local people are worried and frustrated. charmaine deogracias, nhk world, new bataan, philippines. >>> authorities in thailand have charged the former prime minister in connection to the deaths of civilians during a military crackdown against anti-government protesters in 2010. the department of special investigation on thursday issued charges against abhisit and the former deputy prime minister. trial proceedings are expected to start as soon as mid-december. the char
. they can even take care of their own bodily functions and they want to change the government. if you can't be, you can't change anything you stupid, stupid jerks. anyway. [applause] the chapter, focus on how basically the media demonizes the tea party and lionizes occupy wall street. i will get into why they did it later in the third hour of the speech. other areas, everybody has a border but if you talk about a border you are a racist. grant has a border. they don't deserve one that they have one. [laughter] our military is treated on campus with intolerance. if you organize a care package delivery to afghanistan they will be professors and activist groups who say, why are we sending stuff to people who kill babies? i don't get it. i don't have anything beyond that those people are idiots because they allow people like bill maher to speak so they give accolades to tears when he is a terrorist if they get no respect to our troops. there's a chapter in my book on that. conservative women, any women? [applause] you have the toughest job because feminists hate you and they go out of their w
. bottom line, i think, it's no way to govern. it is a giant mistake to have all of this in a pool of ambiguity, and as i understand it now, you would know more. i mean, it truly is a stalemate. they are not talking. >> now, you point out that it's the same player, and, i think, you'll agree player that is matter most are the president, speaker boehner. what do we know about the personal relationship that might illuminate what's going on right now? >> well, they started out last year when they were working on the debt ceiling, and they had what are calledded the merlot and nicorette's meetings. in other words, boehner would have a merlot, and obama would chew nicorette. >> you point outside in the book somehow when they took the official photo, both of those vanished. >> yes. they had iced tea there for obama. of course, boehner had his seg represent, and they put the cigarette in the ashtray away for the picture, but they have not closed the deal on the personal relations, and that's a shame. i think if somebody, instead of sponsoring your breakfast and all, sponsor a weekly dinne
of material to go on, much more than ever before. >> the ministers will seek to the government's support for the ban. one federal interior minister said they have a good case, but he admits there are risks. >> the danger is that these proceedings could give new life to a party that is clearly on the decline. >> next, germany's premiers must decide if they want to follow the recommendation. experts say the process to outlaw the npd could take years. >> ok. peter craven has more from our parliamentary studios. does this mean the npd party will be banned? >> it is difficult to say. i can say it is want to be a long and winding road. the people who support this ban are hoping that both government and parliament will rally around and support it, too. angela merkel is meeting here in berlin tomorrow with the chief ministers of germany, -- germany's 16 federal states to discuss, amongst other things, this precise issue. i can say that angela merkel -- it is a well-known fact -- she is cautious and cagey about this push for a ban. they remember how a bid to get a previous -- a previous bid to ge
-missile system to turkey; the massive protest against the government in cairo; paul krugman on the stalemate over taxes and spending; the ongoing cholera epidemic in haiti; and american military leadership. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: iran claimed today it has captured a u.s. surveillance drone. the "scan-eagle" is used to collect photographic and video images. iranian state television broadcast video of two military commanders examining the aircraft. they said it was seized "in the past few days," but they did not specify where or how. in response, the u.s. navy said none of its unmanned aerial vehicles-- u.a.v.'s-- are missing. and in washington, white house spokesman jay carney raised doubts about tehran's statements. we have no evidence that the iranian claims you cite are true. i'd refer you to the pentagon's comments this morning for details about this particular type of u.a.v., but again we have no evidence that the iranian claims are true. >> sreenivasan: a year ago, iran did manage to down a c.i.a. drone that apparently crossed the borde
emerging economy. we asked about the report the government makes for business and enterprise. it is fair to say that his answer has captured the imagination of all political parties that will respond formally in the spring. so here's what we will do now. first, government spending should be alone with the business community. we will provide new money to support the partnerships. from april 2015, the governmental elites one of the funding and get people back to work. the gross funds are having businesses get back into the game. we are going to support businesses and technologies where britain has a clear technology advantage. we will extend our global lead in aerospace and support the supply chain for advanced infection. we've also support british companies to new emerging markets in asia and africa and the americas. and increasing the funding for the uk by over 25% a year. so they can help more firms build the capacity of overseas british chambers and maintain our country's position as the number one destination in europe for foreign investment. we are launching a new 1.5 billion pounds
's grave for the obvious fact that we believe that the assad government has weapononized chemical and biological agents and put them in a position where they can be used fairly rapidly. as you look back over the 20 months of this conflict, this follows a series of events, one leading to the other which people said could not happen. this began, remember, with peaceful demonstrations. and when assad was unable to control them or suppress, he began to fire on his own people and they began to defend themselves in a very unfair fight which everyone thought we should take sides on the side of freedom and give the freedom fighters the weapons with which they could fight. it happened much too late. and people said, at least he's not using his air force to attack his own people and then he began to attack his own people from the air. now more than 40,000 killed. so when we see the government of assad weaponize chemical and biological agents and put them in bombs, we know this is a leader with no limits and unfortunately he follows his father who proved capable of using weapons against his
the government has a vendetta against him. >> they killed one of my dogs. they broke into all of my houses, they stole. i have been continually harassed by the government. and they're attempted to discharge me with every fine. i have documentations and -- to get it and -- . >> mcafee illegally crossed into guatemala with his fiance and two journalists. he's hired a lawyer. >>> lance armstrong will hold on to his bronze medal from the 2000 sidney games for now. the international olympic committee postponed -- and they stripped four of their medals first athens olympics. they were disqualified after the doping samples came back positive. >>> today, a federal appeals court won't stop a decision to put the large images on all cigarette packages. the appeal asked for a full quarter panel to revisit the case. some of the nation's largest tobacco companies sued to block the mandate, claiming the images and stories of the smokers report true. the government argues the antismoking campaign is factual. >>> like grading your home can make the holidays merry and dangerous. each year, thousands of cons
. syrians have the right to choose their government, the president, and any individual to run the world. as these ideologies are conflicting right now, that is normal. we see that in egypt. each side tries to extend its power through institutions, through the constitution. i think this is a healthy discussion, especially after 40 years of dictatorship. the people are not used to sharing their opinions and hearing other opinions. they need some time to be able to reconcile all of the different ideologies. at the end, i believe in the syrian people that they will be able to end the assad regime. >> thank you. i would like to debate on the ideologies and the syrian opposition. i will let you go into this issue. can you talking about the role played by the syrian muslim brotherhood within the opposition. the majority of the seats still being that of the muslim brotherhood. the leaders are close -- what is the role played by them? >> i think the united states has to deal with the reality with the rise of muslim brotherhood and the whole region, not only in to nietzsche, egypt. the difference
with istanbul, they don't have the greatest relationship with the turkish government. it's a completely different world. it's completely opposite. when their armed forces show up, it's not really lacked upon as a good thin. this is why i want to say thank you to our military that's here today, to the army, the navy, the military in general, the marines, the coast guard, even i saw a couple air force running around here yesterday. the fact that you are here and you are in san francisco and you do this every year, it says a lot. because we lack at -- look at this as a good week. we have a great working relationship and after being there and seeing that it's not a good relationship and people get really, really tense when the guys in green show up, it makes me appreciate what we have all the more. there's one other thing i really appreciate, by the way, and i'll direct this to general speese being the trainer that he is, i got a whole new appreciation for muzzle discipline back there. i appreciate the fact that we drill that into our personnel that don't point anything you don't want t
and operation. you're dealing with deployment of governance, development of projects that extend governance. and then the security framework, we come the afghan people, and oh, by the way, inside with all this there's a lot of people are very contentious. what i call capital t. taliban, little key taliban and different insurgent groups and transnational terrorist groups. just this morning. so this battalion task force, we were given this mission about 2009 and we're going to deploy an approximate 2010. so as i came on board, the battalion and brigade had been to iraq three consecutive tours. and so the shift was intuitive. there were some germane lessons to be learned and transferred to afghanistan, but not everything. in iraq, and having served in iraq it's different when you have an almost second world infrastructure. they had a technical class of people. every september, books would be shipped out of baghdad. there was a system in place for a lot of bureaucratic and government means. they had a history of forming as a government. which we didn't have that in afghanistan. you didn't have
hates the government? maybe singing a little different tune today. >> it's because government's now telling them stop dreaming, stop striving. we'll take care of you. >> she gets the comedians laughing... >> that's hilarious! >> ...and the thinkers thinking. >> okay, so there's wiggle-room in the ten commandments is what you're telling me. >> she's joy behar. ... and current will let me say anything. >> only on current tv. >> cenk: the middle east is on fire, of course, what else is new, right? first we start in egypt where the new president has time to give himself unchecked powers with no oversight over his additions. tens of thousands of protestors marching on the palace. they've breached blockades barbed wire and it is a mess over there. they say this is the last stand and the last warning. over in syria the government is apparently moving its chemical weapons. now, of course is a red line for nato and the u.s. and even russia is concerned about this, saying if you use chemical weapons, then the international community will have to respond. already 40,000 dead in syria. >> in ir
of them who signed the pledge they want to slink government. i listen to c-span. they're so upset about ben gauzey, which they should be upset about, they don't take into account that the state department has a shoestring budget. people are very upset about the compounding, but the f.d.a. operates on a shoestring budget because they have been shrinking government. host: so anne, do you see room for cut? caller: yes, i see room for budget cuts in the defense department. i'm a senior citizen facing retirement, and i really do believe in some means testing for social security. it's an insurance program. and there are people, you're just like with your health insurance, if you're really lucky and you've done the right things, and you're really healthy, you're not complaining that you've paid for health insurance. and then the people who need it, there's money for them. so it's the same thing. there are many people who have benefited greatly, sometimes from unfairnesses that rich people have bought for themselves and our country. but your people have benefited, and so you know why should the
back to state and local governments. but during an era of fiscal restraint and global warming, it's high time that we start this conversation in earnest. how big do you want your fema to be? how generous your disaster relief payments and how much do you want to pay for it? in today's "new york times" op-ed section, there's an article that points out potential liability for flood insurance alone is $1.25 trillion. second only to the liability for social security. right now we have arguably the worst of both worlds. the federal government responds to disaster usually paying too much for the wrong people to do the wrong things. we provide federal money to put people back in harm's way and sometimes provide infrastructure to make future risky development worse. we often take remedial action, like for theifying beaches, a temporary solution, that can actually accelerate erosion elsewhere, shift storm damage down the coast to another spot or more serious flooding downriver. by giving the illusion of protection, more people locate in dangerous areas and the vicious cycle is repeated with
talking with thomas woods junior. the most recent book "rollback: repealing big government before the coming fiscal collapse." this is booktv on c-span2 on locations in las vegas. >>> booktv on facebook. like us to interact with booktv guests and viewers. watch viewers, get up-to-date information facebook.com/booktv. booktv sat down with philip auerswald to discuss his book "the coming prosperity: how entrepreneurs are transforming the global economy." he was in atense for the fall for the book festival held annually at the university. it's about a half an hour. >>> now joining us here at george maison university is professor philip auerswald. the most recent book is "the coming prosperity: how entrepreneurs are transforming the global economy". here's the cover of the book. professor, what role does -- play in economic development? >> well, that's a great question, and maybe i'll talk about what role does fear play in our conversation about. the conversation about the present. when we talk about our reality and share our idea in a marketplace, we're competing with other ideas. we
, down the road an islamist-led government could use the constitution to deny them the right. they don't want to vote on this draft constitution. that's why they're out here protesting at this hour. >> reza, as always, appreciate your reporting from sicairo. >>> strong warning for syria's president not to use chemical weapons against his own people. nato secretary-general said the use of such weapons would result in an immediate reaction, his words. he described the syrian stockpiles as a matter of great concern and president obama has been warning of consequences if al assad makes what mr. obama calls the tragic mistake of using chemical weapons. former british prime minister tony blair voiced his concerns earlier on cnn. >> i mean now the death toll probably would be around 40,000, since this began, since a large number of people. but if there was any sense at all that assad was going to use chemical weapons or did use chemical weapons against his own people i expect a tough response that would be military. >> and nato is taking no chances by trying to protect one of its members, all
a divided government. it is up to us to make this divided government work. we have to set aside partisan concerns. how to work together to prepare this economy to get people back on their feet? how do we get this sense of real security and upper mobility for all americans, especially those in need? they are the same. the old ways will not do. we need new thinking and renewed efforts from all americans. it is true that president obama won reelection. i congratulate him on his victory. on january 20, he will face a a fiscal economy and and i mess. you might say he will inherit these problems. [laughter] [applause] he his second term, i hope t will offer fresh ideas. failure will mean for more years of -- four more years we have work to do. -- four more years. we have work to do. serious solutions for serious reforms, we thank him for doing that. [applause] the election did not go our way. the republican party cannot make excuses. we cannot have the next four years on the sidelines. we need to apply our timeless principles to the challenges of the day. our party excels at representing that
government in the nation of mali, our ally. this may seem inconsequential to the average american, but it could have big implications for our security as well as that of our regional and global allies. because in the power vacuum that was created in that spring coup, al qaeda saw an opportunity and they stepped in. three different extremist groups all linked to or controlled by al qaeda in the islamic magra known as aqim now control an area the size of texas in the northern part of mali. they succeeded in fracturing a formerly stable democracy and contributing to broad security, political and humanitarian crises that i believe have grave implications for the region and for america's interests. to put it simply, mr. president, this matters. mali, a relatively strong democracy for more than two decades, is now embroiled in turmoil. the united states in partnership with the international community must show leadership in helping it rebuild its democracy and restore its territorial integrity by reclaiming it from terrorists. so thi this morninges as the chr of the african chair subcom
government? why would he be doing this? >> well, i think the professor reason is probably do it in conjunction with the anniversary or, on the 17th which is, widely reported in the paper, in the newspapers, but, you know, our assessment is that their desire to continue down this road is motivated by their desire to ensure that their capability, they are now a self-proclaimed nuclear state, their ability to be able to demonstrate to the world that they have the capacity to be able to build missile and have in the technology to be able to use it in ways of their choosing down the road. and this as i said earlier would be very destabilizing i think to not only to the region, but to the international security environment. so who's helping them and my assessment of their ability to be able to launch this missile? i think that they have progressively gained better technology over time, and they have progressively gained that through a number of methods over a number of years and decades. to the degree that they will be more successful than they were last time, in such a short perio
the pressing question of how to respond to the potential use of chemical weapons by the assad government in syria, the government warned him of the consequence conditions consequences he could expect. >> i want to make it clear to assad and those under his command the world is watching, the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> rose: i am pleased to have bob gates back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what are you doing since you left government? >> well, i am working on a book, a mental with a of my time under presidents bush and obama as secretary of defense, and doing some speaking but staying as far from washington, d.c. as i can. >> rose: when you look at writing a book, i mean, how hard is that for you to take the time anand think of all of the events and make sure that you get it right as you recollect it? >> first i have given myself a little out at the beginning by saying this is a purely personal reminiscence
, the u.s. department of state, danish and british governments and of course the afghans, additionally we reached out to the private sector for partnerships, and not for profits to deliver things that we weren't capable of delivering or to cover gaps that arose as we implemented the plan. we implemented the plan through 17 teams through helman and our two female engagement teams. this is actually just scrolling pictures. sometimes a picture says a thousand words and i don't want to take you down the whole history of a year but i wanted to talk to you about how we framed this plan. this plan was framed into 5 pillars and the 5 pillars were students and parents, we attempted to build buy in and assure safety among the students. there was lots of fear of reprisals. by sending your kids to school there was fear that the taliban was going to knock on your door and let you know that that wasn't allowed. previously the taliban had instituted a medrossas so their only forms of education were religious schools and those are religious schools for boys. teachers. there is no teaching force in
to the regime since 2009 when the iranian government was caught off guard and saw the large presence on the internet and getting information from outside of the country and sending information from inside out. it was the twitter rev -- revolution. they were using youtube and blog citizen journalist . this is the dialogue and communication that the government wants to control. so on - >> gretchen: so they are putting satellite blockers. >> it is working. every time there is an obstacle in place they are fining ways to work around it they are technological savvy. three-quarters of the country is under the age of 35. this is not someone they can suppress for too much time . the message to the west and united states in particular, is that this is the achilles heel of the government in iran. they want to protect their existence and they feel vulnerable . they will go to any ends to stop this flow of information. >> gretchen: what should westerners be aware of? is there anything can do? >> support the iranian people in terms of the programs. in the 2009 uprising, there were independent com
republicans hate government and that's why they don't run it very well. >> but they hate government so that's why they don't run it very well. >> right. >> bill press said you can't be in washington without giving you opinion about whether or not we're going off the fiscal cliff, blah, blah blah. and i said the democrats tend to be the responsible party in terms of wanting to govern and then bill says because they hate it, and i say right. why would you make some big operate well that you don't like. >> you are a couple of marksists. >> what did reagan say? the government is the problem. >> right. they don't like the government. >> and i don't suppose the government is anything anybody would ever want to strangle in the bathtub. >> stephanie: no. all right. let's dive in to right-wing world. [♪ circus music ♪] >> stephanie: all right. rush limbaugh. >> folks i'm a little worn-out fed up and very inpatient with these ongoing assaults on the people who work in this country. the current disaster is not teaching people a lesson, nothing will. we're not teaching people to be
's this last group who are willing to compromise and combine their ideologies with governing. it is this group bit by bit who are peeling away the extreme views of the rest of the party. the most important question remains are there enough of them to make a deal and reign in the g.o.p. circus. joining me now charles pierce, writer to esquire and author and host of ring of fire and majority report sam seder. do you feel sorry for john boehner who has all these circus folks with him? >> i don't. >> eliot: shocking to me. >> look, he has--he's trying to maintain his caucus, and you know at the end of the day i don't really invest too heavily about the actual persons of these politicians. the fact that you were talking about lindsey graham who pressureperceived-- >> eliot: i was setting him up to tear him down. >> the point is he's facing re-election. the republican electorate that the republicans have nurtured and grown. they have created frankenstein, i've said it before on this program, and basically they're at the mercy of these people. they created this monster and they can't put it back in t
's not ours? >> yeah, you know, that seems like a pretty narrow claim. it's not the u.s. government saying we have no drones. it's the navy. so all that means is that the navy wasn't involved potentially. there are other countries that have u.s. drones. there are other agencies within the u.s. government that use drones. so i think that's a fairly narrow denial, and, listen, i don't buy a lot of what i hear and read on iranian -- in the iranian state media. some of it is pretty crazy stuff. on the other hand, it's perfectly plausible this has happened. it's happened at least twice before. in october iran tried to shoot down a drone. they captured a cia drone about a year ago. one of the lessons here, one of the things the viewers should conclude from this is iran is the most watched country in the world. the u.s. has satellite intelligence, drone intelligence, human intelligence. israel, saudi arabia, russia, everyone watches iran, and that's an important conclusion to keep in mind. >> so, jim, if it isn't, in fact, our drone and our story is the truth, it's clearly a mystery to us as well wh
businesses which provide 67% of the jobs in this country. that may fund the government for a short time. then, what's the plan? stimulus 2.0. because the first stimulus worked so well? that was a disaster as well. we have a $16 trillion deficit, and the president wants to spend more money. are you kidding me? spending is the problem. we don't need more of it. lastly, he wants the power to raise the debt ceiling without congressional approval. the administration cannot issue an edict like a money monarchy. congress, congress, congress is in control of the purse. we have gone wild and that's just the way it is. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois seek recognition? mr. quigley: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. quigley: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, the impact that independent locally owned businesses have in our communities comes as no surprise. the social and environmental outcomes are essentia
, but nonetheless, you have the other branches of government. . there's also the definition of the future of egyptian society. >> i was interested to see what you were writing about on the bbc website. you point out that while the elections may be exciting, the future of egypt is enshrine in this constitution that they are haggling over right now. >> and obviously, the constitution, you could argue whether egypt is better with or without one. probably better with one. although, there are great problems with freedom of religion, freedom of association, freedom of the press, freedom of rights for women. it will have to be improved upon. >> this is where political will and puritanism will be enshrined. >> will these various players compete to monopolize? that has been their experience and tradition going back tomorrow. or will this competition and tension actually produce respect for the roles of these institutions and compromise? something that they are clearly going to have to try to figure out. >> and you can see it even with americans in capitol hill. what are your thoughts about how thi
the other branches of government. . there's also the definition of the future of egyptian society. >> i was interested to see what you were writing about on the bbc website. you point out that while the elections may be exciting, the future of egypt is enshrine in this constitution that they are haggling over right now. >> and obviously, the constitution, you could argue whether egypt is better with or without one. probably better with one. although, there are great problems with freedom of religion, freedom of association, freedom of the press, freedom of rights for women. it will have to be improved upon. >> this is where political will and puritanism will be enshrined. >> will these various players compete to monopolize? that has been their experience and tradition going back tomorrow. or will this competition and tension actually produce respect for the roles of these institutions and compromise? something that they are clearly going to have to try to figure out. >> and you can see it even with americans in capitol hill. what are your thoughts about how this will work out? >> if you
was, a detailed set of reforms in health programs, government programs over ten years, which are going to be tough, but we think they make sense. they don't like all those changes, they might want to go beyond that. but they have to tell us what those things are. you're right on the revenue side. we're proposing to let the rates go back to clinton levels. that would be a good thing to do as a sensible economic policy, and we want to combine that with tax reforms that will limit deductions. there's no surprise in this. we have been proposing this for a very long time. the president campaigned on it and i think that's where we're going to end up. and i think that's there going to be very broad support from the business community and from the american people for an agreement with roughly that shape. >> when you talked about limiting the deductions there have been proposals from governor romney during the presidential campaign, and from other republicans, when you talk about those limitations on deductions, do you include the charitable deduction and the home mortgage deduction? >> i think
the immediate impact from the government coming back and spending wouldn't be that great. the question then is how do businesses and consumers react? i don't think it will be a pretty sight. >> what about the debt ceiling? there was a suggestion? geithner's opening bid that they do a permanent fix and give the president the operative control over whether or not the debt ceiling is raised. there's a lot of confusion out there about what the debt ceiling really is. opponents to this tend to argue this will increase government spending when you and i know it's just to raise the limit for what congress has already appropriated to be spent. >> in a perfect world a debt ceiling is a stupid way to run a railroad. congress should appropriate what it wants to appropriate. the white house and the executive branches should go ahead and spend it and that's the way you should run it. we're not in a perfect world and we have the debt ceiling. i don't see any possibility that the republicans are going to permanently give up the right to weigh in on the debt ceiling from time to time. on the other han
the size of government. and i welcome that. he's choosing to do it outside now rather than inside the senate but he's had a huge, positive influence on the senate and we're going to continue to see that for years to come. >> senator, this may seem like a simple question, but i wonder, and a lot of people do is the senate from your perspective, is the senate a difficult place to be if you are someone who comes from executive background or someone committed to getting things done? is it a frustrating place to exist, day in and day out? >> i would say to you, i saw the article that you wrote earlier today, governors do -- who are used to having their own planes and flying around their states and controlling their own schedules do find it more challenging in the senate. i came from the state senate in wyoming. i enjoyed the opportunity to work with people on both side of the aisle to discuss the issues and continue to try to move proposals forward that i believe in about. i believe this is a place where you can make an effective difference in the direction of the country. >> now, let'
. >> it certainly is. the problem is though, this is all states rights versus the federal government. but it's still a federal crime, so what's the federal government going to do? could they shut it all down? >> this is the $64 billion question. what is the federal government going to do. the only thing they've said is they're reviewing the laws, they're going to sit back and see how they are implemented and see where they can go from there. they've reminded both states pot is still illegal. i think the concern is when you create these havens of legal pot in colorado and here in washington state and have a black market around them, what's going on the effect? are these going to be magnets for illegal pot? are you going to have problems on the border a? it's not clear. they're waiting and seeing how this goes. >> thanks very much to miguel. miguel's talking about marijuana and it got us thinking about the war on drugs. it's cost this country more than a trillion dollars since it was launched by president nixon as the war on drugs 40 years aerks but the effort is being dubbed a failure and waste of mo
, biochemical pathways that govern cell behavior that may be similar in specifically disparate diseases or quite different in patients with the same disease. so what they're saying to you through this letter is that of course they're going to do what we tell them to do. but the very intent of what we're wanting to accomplish is you're going to delay the outcome. because we haven't significantly in the last three years, significantly increased n.i.h.'s budget, so limited dollars are going to be spent as directed through this recalcitrant bill that aren't going to direct the translational research and biochemical pathway research that they're in. and i would just tell my colleagues, in the next ten years, we're going to see such phenomenal changes in -- in our approach to disease and the treatments for that. and the reason we're going to see it is because we quit looking at diseases and we started looking at translational genomics and biochemical pathways. and so i -- i will be one of the few who will vote against this and i'm fine with a -- a voice vote if no other colleagues object. i have no pr
is the minister, the father is the father, the sun is the son and jeff government. so if everyone in his, and i should say or her place though confucianism doesn't leave much fun for the element. and that within the region and with the world as china looks at, a sense of harmony, japan would be law, that sense of harmony and how you would achieve it is that their frustration is that the work is not just acquiescing to the notion that they are a rich country, that they are returning, that they're powerful, that they want respect. and they want to see the world kind of step back and give it greater latitude, but doesn't see this. this is what i think whether i personally think we are on a collision course. because when you look at what china's expectations of the world are, you also look at its paranoia, you look at jim, i'd love to hear utah, you're such an expert insider, what's going on in the cyber world. you see something which seems hard to me, despite her best efforts in not one to replace history, that the rise of a great power usually and often leads to messiness. usually and often leads
for the disabled worldwide is to be active in this. [inaudible] many of these in the government do little bras little for their people. they often corrupt government i think the state department should strengthen its outreach in this important area and even drafted a statute law that required them to establish a department within their agency. they have is on their goals, but i don't think it domino leadership, and i think that is the way the government normally runs on here. you have a secretary of state, the president of the united states, and the secretary said certain priorities. you have to raise the level of priorities with the disabled. i truly believe that. i have a real clear vision. a vision of people when you have computer and a blind person with a disability or the a person with weakened vision can read it or the computer can talk to them. they talk to the computer and it talks back. it's not that expensive. that is one thing that we ought to be doing is advancing and ensuring that the equipment and devices and treatment better life transforming are given more emphasis by governmen
. and so, listen, i understand ideologically why people who believe that they want to shrink government up so small they can drown it in a bathtub may always lead that way, but it's not in the best interest of the american people in my humble opinion. >> i am going to be measured in my response because you all have an obligation to ask questions. but i hope at some point you all who have heard us on this side and the other side of the aisle talking about this will do the math, quite honestly. i can tabulate very quickly for you $3 trillion worth of cuts that have now gone into law that democrats have been there on the tough -- on those tough negotiations. the chairman mentioned $1 trillion that was exacted as a result of the budget control act where the republicans were threatening for the first time have the nation default on its credit if we didn't do something. $1 trillion. that's already taking place, the $1 trillion in cuts. there's another $1.2 trillion that came from the same law, as we know, as the sequester, that also by law will start to take place. that's $2.2 trillion. we talke
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